What Makes FMEA a Must-Have Analysis During ISO 26262 Safety Lifecycle

What Makes FMEA a Must-Have Analysis During ISO 26262 Safety Lifecycle

ISO 26262 document lays a lot of emphasis on inductive analysis. As a matter of fact, it is a required activity for all ASIL grades (ASIL D to ASIL A). And although, ISO 26262 does not specify which Inductive Analysis to perform, FMEA comes up as a very obvious option. Not only because it has been used across industries to find the failure modes and their impact, but also due to its efficiency and maturity as a proven method.

In our latest vlog, we will talk about FMEA in the context of automotive Functional Safety.

Being a qualitative analysis, FMEA does not provide the FuSa experts with any metrics but goes a long way in identifying the different ways, a fault can occur and the impact it may cause. However, it does help in improving the Risk Priority Number (RPN).

There are multiple inputs to the process of FMEA that help in identification of the failure modes and their local as well as system effects. The vlog primarily discusses these inputs.

Key Takeaways from the FMEA vlog:

  • Why is FMEA required?
  • Different inputs to identifying the failure modes
  • Example of an FMEA report

FMEA is one among the many safety analysis activities that is performed during the safety lifecycle. We hope that you like this vlog. Stay tuned for more such videos on ISO 26262 and Automotive Embedded landscape.

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